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What were five weaknesses of the constitution? law answers (14613)

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Collecting from a previous employer

A:  There's probably no way of giving you a definite answer without a full reading of the terms and conditions of the tuition refund plan. "they will not pay the fees ($4,995.00 plus intrest) due to the fact that the grades were not given to them priot to me terminating my employemnt with them...the grades were avaliable 3 days prior to ending my employment." What evidence to you have that you providing the grades to them 3 days prior to terminating your employment with them? Available to whom? If grades were not available to employer you may have a fatally weak point? What constitutes availability--delivery--? You keep saying "that it states that "The grades must be made avaliable to them, (not submitted), but avaliable to them" before I end...

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Strengths and weaknesses of the Texas constitution?

A:  Strength and weaknesses of the texas constitution?  ...

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How did the constitution improved the weaknesses of the articles of confederation?

A:  Answer On the third day of the convention of the constution, Edmond Randolph of Virginia proposed a plan for a new, strong central government. James Madison was the principal author of the Virginia Plan. The Virginia Plan called for the central government to have three separate branches....

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How did the weaknesses and strengths of the Articles of Confederation later affect American law and the constitution?

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What are the weaknesses of the UK constitution?

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What are the strengths and weaknesses of the austrilian constitution and us bill of rights?

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Under God or under the constitution?

A:  I agree with Patrick! <buckeye-ELO...nospam.net> wrote in message news:pp3r70lh12l1trl4ad2212loi1j93uuhi7...4ax.com... Received in my email this morning: Under God or Under the constitution? I, for one, applaud the courage and conviction of Dr. Michael Newdow in arguing his case (Elk Grove Unified School District v. Newdow, No. 02-1624) for the unconstitutional nature of the Pledge of Allegiance insofar as it contains the phrase, "under God." Indeed, I think his arguments-along with several found in the amicus briefs-are sound and persuasive, while the arguments of the U.S. Solicitor General and most of the justices of the Supreme Court are rather weak. Unlike Dr. Newdow, I am not an atheist, but with him, I believe the...

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Why were the Articles of Confederation weak?

A:  The articles gave the government no separation of powers. The government was too weak, the Articles left much of the power to the states (if I remember correctly, states basically went by their own state constitution). Congress didn''t have the power to tax. To change the Articles, it had to be decided unanimously by all states. Also, 9 out of the 13 states had to approve any major law before it was passed and Congress couldn''t regulate commerce. There was no president to lead, no established court system, and every state had only one vote in congress. Basically, the articles created no separate executive department to carry out and enforce the acts of Congress and no national court system to interpret the meaning of

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What Is a constitutional Amendment?

A:  A constitutional amendment is an addition or change to the constitution that administers a government or organization. A constitution is the initial charter adopted when such a body is first formed. This is the primary document group members will reference when considering a questionable law or practice. It is designed to apply as written throughout the organizationís existence. Amending a constitution can be a rigorous process, because such amendments must be judged to uphold the spirit of the original document. The U.S. constitution is probably the most famous example of an amended constitution, but it is not the...

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What are the Primary Theories of constitutional Interpretation?

A:  Theories of constitutional interpretation in the United States are varied and complex, but most fall into one of several major categories. Judges charged with deciding constitutional issues may subscribe to a number of different theories including originalism, textualism, intentionalism, contextualism, constructionism, pragmatism, non-interpretivism and dynamic evolution. Fortunately, many of these theories of constitutional interpretation are somewhat related to each other, making them slightly easier to comprehend and group together. For example, those who take an originalism approach believe that the U.S. constitution should be interpreted as close to its original meaning as possible....