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What questions do attorneys ask jurors? law answers (427697)

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Q: 

I have Joint Legal Custody of my 7 yr old granddaughter granted by a court order from the State of Virginia. I also have the right to schedule, pay for, and transport my granddaughter to her extra-curricular activities. I have visitation, etc. etc., like a divorced Dad because I was the primary caregiver to my granddaughter for 6.5 years until my daughter moved them to GA. I have relocated to GA since then also.My daughter refuses to allow me to take my granddaughter to her Soccer practices. She has her live-in girlfriend taking her. Today I asked the girlfriend, at soccer practice, if she''d read the court order. She stated she didn''t want to get in the middle of it and I told her she already was in the middle of it by bringing my granddaughter to the practice which is a clear violation of the court order. The conversation deteriorated to the point the girlfriend took my granddaughter after practice straight to her car. I followed my granddaughter to say good-bye to her and the girlfriend told me to get away from her car, I told her I just wanted to say goodbye and then she got up in my face like she was going to hit me. She threatened to call the police and I told her to go ahead and we''ll see who leaves with my granddaughter because it won''t be you. She backed off and left but it all happened in front of my granddaughter. I am planning to take my daughter back to court for this and other violations of the court order. My question is: if this girl had called the police, would they have made my granddaughter stay with this girl or would they have let me have her because I have the joint legal custody order? My daughter and this girl just think because they live together and my granddaughter has to live with her Mom because she has physical custody, then the girlfriend thinks that gives her rights over my granddaughter. It''s not just her but includes her whole family like they have rights to my family (myself, my daughter, and my granddaughter). I have never encountered anyone before this that ever stepped all over and across that boundary of my family that they have totally disrespected and torn up. I don''t know what to do to get them to stop and it''s my 7 yr old granddaughter that''s being affected the most by this craziness. She looked so sad and frightened today and I don''t know what it would have done to her if this girl had hit her grandmother right in front of her.Please help me with some guidance or referral to a good family law attorney in Marietta, GA that could help me win this fight. The girlfriend is also bi-polar and has OCD. My daughter is also currently in a year long DUI program because she got 2 DUI''s within 8 months.

A:  Let me start by saying it was extremely foolish for you to be so confrontational at the event. You could easily have ended up in jail depending on how it played out, and such a reaction could adversely affect you in a future custody battle. Having said that, retain counsel. Be aware that grandparents usually come second to parents, so any grandparent case is an uphill battle, and that, even with good facts, you can improve, or worsen, your case by chosing confrontation over the legal process. Buried in your post are things that help you, or might, and you want good counsel to focus on those and guide you better on what to do (and not do). Good luck....

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What type of questions should I ask an intellectual property law attorney?

A:  If you are looking to protect intellectual property that you have created, you should start by determining the type of legal protection that is available and most appropriate for you.  These types of questions are most appropriate for an intellectual property law attorney.  Your first task will be to explore and understand the legal concepts of patents, trademark, and copyright, and to determine which legal protections are applicable to the intellectual property that you wish to protect.  Once an intellectual property attorney has helped you make this determination, you then will need to ask how the legal process works in terms of obtaining such protection for your...

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My husband and I were injured in a bus accident. My husband will be out of work for a year and my part-time income cannot support our family. Our attorney says a structured settlement will give us regular payments, but he never has put one together. He would hire an expert. Should we trust him? What kind of questions should I ask? Should I shop around?

A:  It is always better to have an attorney who is experienced rather than a novice for most purposes. You don?t want to pay your attorney for the time he will be learning what he has to know to help you. That is not to say, however, that your attorney can?t become educated in the process by engaging an expert. (Perhaps you can negotiate a lower fee with him because of his limited knowledge and simply rely on an expert to get a good portion of the information you need on this one issue.) You will have to ask the right questions to make sure you know all you need to know before settling on a structure. Without an experienced attorney, however, you are taking somewhat of a risk that you will not be getting all of the information you need to make...

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What questions Are Important To ask A Prospective Attorney?

A:  Some of the things you may want to ask the lawyer when you talk over the phone or meet include: How much experience do you have with legal issues similar to mine? How recently have you handled a case like mine? How was it resolved? (Went to trial, settled out of court, etc.) What was the result? (Did you win the case? Did you lose?) What type of fee do you charge? Will you or an assistant do most of the work on my case? Do you regularly communicate with your clients?...

Q: 

What questions Are Important To ask A Prospective Attorney?

A:  Some of the things you may want to ask the lawyer when you talk over the phone or meet include: How much experience do you have with legal issues similar to mine? How recently have you handled a case like mine? How was it resolved? (Went to trial, settled out of court, etc.) What was the result? (Did you win the case? Did you lose?) What type of fee do you charge? Will you or an assistant do most of the work on my case? Do you regularly communicate with your clients?...

Q: 

In adoption case what kind of questions do social workers ask the children?

A:  You need to be more specific. It really depends on the age of the child and the circumstances. It also would rely on what the child is being asked about. More info please! Children who are to be adopted by a foster family? Children who are already in the home? Children who have been removed from their natural home?...

Q: 

I took my Father to change his will at his request. The attorney asked that I step outside. I was told it was totally confidential and they had to know I was not influencing him in any way. I was ok with that since I did not know what was in his will to begin with. After I took him home, he asked me to read it to him. When I did, he said that it was not the way he wanted it done. I asked him did they not explain it to him and he said that it was just not the way he wanted it done. What can I do about this? I am afraid that if I take him back, they will think that I have tried to change his mind about the way it was done. I don''t think that they have explained it where he could understand what it was saying. Is it legal for them to ask me to stay outside when I don''t think they explain it to him correctly? Why could I not stay in the room to make sure he understood it?

A:  Your father can contact the lawyer and go back to make sure it complies with his wishes. That''s it. If you get so concerned about your role, or how you are perceived, that it affects what you do, you ARE exerting your own influence for your own personal reasons. Further, why on earth do you think it was not ''legal'' for them to ask you to step outside? It was not your lawyer, your will, or your office. To be direct, you need to worry less about you and more about simply allowing your father to get a will done as he would like to have it done....

Q: 

I''m 18 years old, and last Friday I hosted a party in my back yard--essentially advertised as ''open-door policy'' and welcomed people to bring guests. Tons of people came that I didn''t know, and like an idiot, I accepted drinks from them. My house ended up getting broken into and 1000''s of dollars worth was stolen from me--among the stolen goods were cash, electronics, my friends credit card (which she canceled), and, the reason I am posting this question to begin with, some xanax, valium, and ritalin for which I did not have a prescription to. After asking around I was able to narrow down a physical description of the thieves, and I now know who brought them. I can interrogate the guys who brought them and can probably get the names of the thieves, or at least some of them. However, from that point I don''t know what to do, since I had illegal possession of prescription medication and don''t think I can go to the cops. Of course I wouldn''t demand the pills back, mostly it''s the sentimental, irreplaceable items that were stolen from me that I would want back (one of the cameras was an SLR that my grandpa owned and had given to me), but what kind of legal position does that put me in? Also, would it complicate matters that it occurred at a party where underage drinking was occurring? Honestly, I''m not a bad kid and have absolutely no experience in these matters. It was my first party of that proportion, and it was my naivete that caused me to get taken advantage of. There''s no way I think I can bring this matter to justice on my own because I''m seriously a weak little girl--spineless in the face of intimidating, thieving thugs! Help? Additional information: the cops came 3 times during the night (it''s not what it seems like). The first time, for parking issues--a large party with numerous party-goers on a small street with limited parking led many idiots to double-park. The second time, one of my friends had called the cops to break up a fight down the street started among people we had KICKED OUT of the party. The third time, they came merely to check up on us and make sure everything was okay. We were not loud enough for them to break up the party, and it seemed they were aware there was underage drinking but didn''t seem to care.

A:  Okay. Here''s the deal. The legal advice part is short. The other part is probably going to be more helpful... On the legal advice side, you seem to have a REALLY good handle on the issues. You participated in illegal activities (with no victims), and became a victim of opportunists who saw the situation for what it was. You just cannot go to the cops with this. You don''t know what you''ll get, and, more likely than not, a cop worth his salt would probably sit you on the curb and tell you the following: You got yourself into a mess of your own making. You got lucky with the drugs, alcohol, open party, etc. You got unlucky with your choice (or non-choice) of guests. I am impressed with your ability to reason through it. You may have read some of these questions...

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What questions are illegal to ask in a job interview in California?

A:  Illegal job interview questions include questions that seek to elicit answers that would reveal information that no candidate is required to give to a prospective employer. Specifically, these questions are questions that ask for information about the candidate’s legally protected categories of age, race, religious beliefs, country of origin, marital status, physical disabilities that do not impact job performance and (in some states) sexual preference. Examples: Are you married? Are you planning to get married? Do you have children? Are you planning to have children? Where were you born? What''s your sexual orientation? Have you ever been...

Q: 

How to ask a legal question – Do''s and Don''ts

A:  I find that sites such as these are good starting points when you have a legal question. Members of askinglaw and other sites can often point you in the right direction such as individual lawyer websites, state law websites, and federal websites. A lot of lawyers won''t answer law questions online, even for informational purposes as it may appear to be legal advice. I don''t see why they wouldn''t just giving their contact information and law firm website and tell the questioner to contact them. Regardless of what lawyers think, this is the web age....