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What exactly is the supreme court? law answers (486485)

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Q: 

What Falls Under supreme court Jurisdiction?

A:  A courts ability to hear a case is known as its jurisdiction. In the United States (US), federal supreme court jurisdiction is limited. Its original jurisdiction includes cases such as those involving disputes between states, disputes of which the US is a named party, and cases involving US citizens and foreign entities. To understand supreme court jurisdiction, it is important to understand a term known as original jurisdiction. This refers to the ability of a court to be the first to hear a case. For example, the supreme court has original jurisdiction in any case that involves a dispute in...

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What is an Appellate court?

A:  An appellate court is a court with the authority to review decisions made by lower courts, and to hand down new decisions, when appropriate. In most countries, the legal system has several levels, which allows people to potentially petition a series of appellate courts if they feel that their cases have not been judged fairly. One well-known example of an appellate court is the supreme court of the United States, which is considered to be a court of last resort. Once a decision is handed down by the supreme court, there is no higher

Q: 

Under what circumstances does the US supreme court have original jurisdiction? Shouldn''t the SCOTUS have had original jurisdiction in the DOJ v Arizona immigration law case?

A:  The supreme court does has original jurisdiction over many (but not all) lawsuits in which a state is a party. Even then, it doesn''t have *exclusive* original jurisdiction. Lower federal courts can also hear such cases if Congress authorizes them to, which it did long ago....

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What article of the constitution established the United States supreme court?

A:  Established by Article 3 of the Constitution of the United States. Section 1 of Article 3 of the Constitution provides for vesting the judicial power of the United States in one supreme court and in such inferior courts as Congress establishes. Section 2 defines the scope of U.S. judicial power and establishes the jurisdiction of the supreme court. The judicial power extends to all cases arising under the Constitution, laws, and treaties of the United States; to cases concerning foreign diplomats and admiralty practice; and to diversity cases (those between citizens of different states) and cases in which the United States or a state is a...

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What are the jurisdictional boundaries of the US supreme court?

A:  The supreme court is empowered to hear cases on appeal that originate anywhere in the United States or its territories....

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What federal courts are lower than the US supreme court?

A:  JUDICIAL_BRANCH_(Article_III_courts)_''>JUDICIAL BRANCH (Article III courts) US District courts The 94 US District courts are the trial courts of the federal judiciary. They have jurisdiction over most types of cases, both civil and criminal, within their geographical territory. Appeals from US District courts go to the US court of Appeals Circuit courts. US court of International Trade The US court of International Trade is located in New York City, and has nationwide jurisdiction over cases involving customs and other international trade...

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Explain the mechanics of the Georgia State supreme court

A:  IANAL. The Georgia supreme court has discretionary power over all cases, yet they have many more demands on their docket than the court of Appeals. Basically, there is only one supreme court that has to decide whether to hear cases from the entire state whereas a court of Appeals is only regional. So there is less of a chance that the supreme court will fit the case in their docket than that the court of Appeals would, for a roundabout answer. Also, the court of Appeals has a firm grasp on what the law is, so unless...

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What Is a Federal court Subpoena?

A:  A federal court subpoena is a legal summons asking a person to produce testimony or evidence for use in a federal court case. People are obliged to respond when they receive subpoenas, or they may be penalized for contempt of court. The subpoena provides information about where and when to appear, for those who choose to comply. People who want to contest a subpoena should retain the services of a lawyer to assist with filing a response to the summons. In the United States, the federal court system includes the district courts, specialty courts such as bankruptcy courts,

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What Is the Supremacy Clause?

A:  The Supremacy Clause is the section of the United States Constitution stating that the constitution is the supreme law of the land, and no other laws will supersede it. The clause was a departure from the previous federal system in the United States, which was enacted under the Articles of the Confederation. That system included a weak federal government, and was later found to be impractical, which led to the development of the United States Constitution and the inclusion of this clause. Unlike the amendments, which were primarily added after the original passage of the constitution, the supremacy clause has been in it since the very beginning. It is found in Article VI, Section 2, in the location that spells out...

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What is the laws intent for protecting the free exercise of religion?

A:  The First Amendment begins, ''Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof...'' Traditionally, this has been interpreted to mean that Congress shall not ''establish'' an official national religion (the ''establishment clause''), or interfere with any individual''s practice of religion (the ''free exercise clause''). There was little debate regarding the free exercise clause until 1879. In Reynolds v. United States, the supreme court decided that a territorial anti-polygamy law was legal despite the fact that polygamy was considered a religious practice. The court decided that although the *federal*...