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What does motion to suppress mean? (in criminal law)? answers (234882)

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Q: 

criminal law

A:  Before anything else, thanks for writing me at AllExperts.com Federal Law: "Codigo Penal Federal" (criminal Law Code). Art. 141: CAPITULO VIII Conspiración Artículo 141.- Se impondrá pena de uno a nueve años de prisión y multa hasta de diez mil pesos a quienes resuelvan de concierto cometer uno o varios de los delitos del presente Título y acuerden los medios de llevar a cabo su determinación. (penalty: 1 to 9 years of jail and until $10,000 pesos) You can get a copy of criminal Code at: http://www.diputados.gob.mx/LeyesBiblio/doc/9.doc Any doubt or another question, let me know it please. Thank you very much for visiting me at AllExperts.com...

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criminal laws online?

A:  It depends on your state, but most states put the criminal code online for free. On Ohio, and I assume most other states, the Revised Code contains the criminal law as well (in Ohio its Title 29 of the Ohio Revised Code.) Most criminal laws are simply codified from old common law, so most states have the same offenses, however levels of offense and sentences may differ. If you found your state''s revised code, see if there is a table of contents or index and then look for ''Crimes and Procedures'' or something to that effect. I would recomment the Legal Information Institute available through Cornell University Law School''s library. Click here: http://www.law.cornell.edu/search/ Depends...

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Which one of the following constitutes a reason for the establishment of criminal laws?

A:  B..................... All have been used as rational for establishment of criminal laws. B. B, but the answer you choose might be different depending on societal values. The correct answer is ''B'' as stated in your text book....

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persons under 21,d.u.i. possible motion to suppress ?

A:  You can''t and yes....

Q: 

persons under 21,d.u.i. possible motion to suppress ?

A:  You can''t and yes....

Q: 

Clarification regarding law school lecture from professor in criminal law procedure?

A:  I believe the case would have a sealed acquittal, though I''m not 100% sure, it might remain unsealed unless there is a separate motion to seal it upon completion. This might also vary State to State. The record exists as soon as the arrest is made. They never destroy records, so the only option would be sealing it, which would happen automatically upon completion of the ACOD (in New York, we don''t use the ''O'', it''s just an ''ACD'', but it''s the same thing). Note: if you are in New York Courts, be wary of confusing an A and a CD (A level misdemeanor and Conditional Discharge) with an ACD. The former is a significant misdemeanor, which will stay on the record, but not result in jailtime...

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criminal Law

A:  Were the cops called, a police report made and was the fine imposed by a court? If you paid a fine, yes, it''s part of your criminal record. yes, paying a fine is pleading guilty unless there was some other plea agreement in place. So yes you have a criminal record of this the cops were never called, nor did i have to go to court. But I paid the fine directly to Walmart.......

Q: 

criminal laws against underage drinking?

A:  Uh yes, because underage consumption is a crime. A person that commits a crime is a criminal. Well they broke the law so yes, they are considered to be criminals. No, they are not a criminal any more than speeding makes you a criminal. You get fined, pay your ticket, and don''t make the same mistake again. underage drinking is more of a violation than a crime. it is like speeding. If they do nothing wrong and do not get caught, I have no problem. If they get a DUI, Assault, Kill or do anything else bad they are treated the same under the law as anyone else would be....

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''criminal laws'' do you think certain laws should be decriminalized?

A:  Laws are not criminal so you can''t decriminalize them. Laws are legal by definition. I guess some laws over the years have been unconstitutional, but they weren''t ''criminal.'' We have the highest rate of incarceration in the industrialized world and still a higher crime rate than most of those countries. That should tell you something. Not only do we need to rethink the conservative ''tough on crime'' mind set, we need to completely abandon the prison for profit system that rewards prisons for keeping people imprisoned rather than rewarding them for rehabilitating those who can be rehabilitated. slaps on the wrist never helps......

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Is being an illegal alien breaking criminal law or tort law?

A:  They are guilty of a civil offense (punishable by a fine), not a crime (punishable by fine/prison). US Code offenses include: USC TITLE 8 > CHAPTER 12 > SUBCHAPTER II > Part VIII > § 1323 makes it unlawful to bring anyone into the country who does not have a passport or visa. Penalty: a *civil* penalty of $3,000 fine per person. TITLE 8 > CHAPTER 12 > SUBCHAPTER II > Part VIII > § 1324a makes it unlawfull to knowingly hire, recruit or refer anyone who is here illegally. Penalty: a *civil* penalty of not less than $250 and not more than $2,000 for each unauthorized alien. TITLE 8 > CHAPTER 12 > SUBCHAPTER II > Part VIII > § 1325 Any alien who is apprehended while entering (or attempting to enter) the United States at a time or place other than as designated by...