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What are the disadvantages of a written constitution? law answers (498084)

People haved asked the following law querstions similar to "what are the disadvantages of a written constitution?". If you have other legal doubts, use the box above to get answers.

Q: 

college student rights

A:  "What are the rights of a college student?" Since most college students are adults, they have the same rights as everyone else. "Said college is offering a program. After completion of the program you need to be certified." By whom or what? What sort of program? "Is the school in default?" In default of what? "Was it there responsibility to know about the new changes and inform me about the changes to the program they were offering." Probably not. It certainly was YOUR responsibility to know the requirements of the profession you were choosing. Unless the school guaranteed that you would be eligible to sit for the certification exam if you completed the program, then I don't see that you have any viable legal claim. One would have to review...

Q: 

contractor gone bankrupt

A:  You can certainly consult an attorney and review your options. Initial consultation could be free. But you are probably on a long list of unsecured creditors, whose chances of getting any money are slim to none if the contractor filed Ch 7. So I'm not sure I'd be throwing good money after bad to hire a lawyer. But that's up to you. Might be another story if he filed Ch 13 or Ch 11. "what are the chances of a subcontractor getting money he is owed from the contractor after he has filed BK in CA?" Public or private job? Did you timely and properly serve a preliminary notice? Is there a payment bond on the job? Did you record/serve a mechanic's lien and/or stop notice? Did the contractor file a Ch 7 or 13 BK? How much $$?...

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Question on divorce and custody

A:  Is there a reason you didn't just say "father" vs. "biofather"? Just asking. His adultery wouldn't bear on the custody issue. "... what are the chances of a biofather winning custody?" If you're talking about full physical custody vs. 50-50/joint physical and legal custody, presumably you'd have to prove there's something seriously wrong with mom (or the judge in question would have to give particular weight to where the kid wants to live, which may or may not happen). If they'd both wind up living in the same school district, etc., I'd see no reason for there not to be a 50-50 physical custody situation. Your friend needs to discuss with a local divorce attorney. Adultery may not have anything to do with it. If the child is...

Q: 

Full custodial parent

A:  You have failed to state any relevant factors which would support a court giving you primary custody and allowing you to relocate out of state with the child. "What are the chances of a court granting me full custodial parent if i were to file an Order?" Not sure what you mean by "Order", but his being in arrears is irrelevant to the issue of full physical custody. Discuss with a local family law attorney. You have to prove that the move is in the child best interest. If you have a good job lined up and extended family in this new state you might have a chance, however if you get up and move to this new state before divorce has been filed or given permission to move, that might give you problems. You cannot file any divorce papers in...

Q: 

Do I have rights if I am the birth father but another man signed the birth certificate?

A:  A child born to a married couple is considered legitimate in the eyes of the law. However, the fact that a person''s name appears on a birth certificate is not conclusive proof of paternity. Since there is no requirement that a father sign a birth certificate, a mother may list anyone whom she believes is, or wants to be, the father. If the parents of a child were not married when the mother became pregnant or when the child was born, the child does not have a legal father until paternity is established. All states have programs under which birthing hospitals give unmarried parents of a newborn the opportunity to acknowledge the father''s paternity of the child. States must also generally help parents acknowledge paternity up to the child''s eighteenth birthday...

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I need help re: willfull desertion or neglect of child law

A:  boomer, Mo''s bio father is not the problem. His parental rights can be relinquished by court order very easily. What you need is a consent von Mo''s bio mother that she''s relinquishing her rights, giving you the green light to adoption. Until she consents resp. until you can prove that bio mom is unfit as a parent, you''ll remain guardian. Have you spoken to bio mom? Is she willing for the sake of Mo to relinquish her parental rights? Quote:If neither parent and no relatives make a claim on the child within the course of at least 18 months after placement into a foster home, the court may opt to terminate the birthparents'' parental rights so the child may be adopted by other parents. http://encyclopedia.adoption.com/entry/abandonment/2/1.html Thank you CJane. It''s nice to hear from...

Q: 

What does a Judge do on an average day?

A:  There are lots of different types of judges, with very different schedules. So I''ll take a stab at what probably happened the day you were in court. A judge is assigned to a case by the presiding judge, who is like a judge supervisor. The assigned judge likely arrived about 7:30 for an 8:30 trial, and will handle the case from jury selection through verdict. His or her office is usually right behind the podium where they sit in court, BTW. If the case is important enough to warrant jury selection, then that''s going to be the only thing he deals with for a while. So he has already been reading the various briefs and motions filed, and has to have rulings ready on all of them as soon as court convenes at probably 8:30. The arguments and counter arguments for the motions might take an hour....

Q: 

Could a judge force my husband to let me keep the house?

A:  It''s possible that a judge may order the house kept for some period of time with him still on the mortgage (AND on the deed, of course), but it may only be for a few years - and then you''ll be expected to either sell and split the proceeds or refi and buy him out. But I certainly wouldn''t expect that you''ll be allowed to keep him on the mortgage until the kids are grown. Because of the standard "Due on Transfer" clause that most mortgages contain, it is highly unlikely that you could became the sole owner until you can remove the mortgage via refinance. The action of transferring title could trigger the loan to be called "due". So, IF you are temporarilly allowed to keep the house, he will likely remain co-owner until the loan is removed. Which means he will be...

Q: 

Can a father file for custody, having already been ordered to pay child support?

A:  I''m in Los Angeles - BTW. My ex stopped seeing his children once he got his visitation to 30% (it started off at 0% and it took him 2 years to ''earn'' 30% visitation - he''s a terrible father) and his child support lowered to reflect that amount of time spent. Once we left that court that day this was ordered, he never saw two of the children the entire time they were minors. So I went years without going back to court and getting it adjusted (which I wish I hadn''t waited). Finally, when I had one child left at home (the other two were grown and still had not seen their dad for about 9 years) I finally had it and brought him back to court to get the child support adjusted to reflect that I had our daughter 100% time. Well, as soon as he got served, he started taking his court ordered...

Q: 

Will I get Order of Sale?

A:  I''m not sure what you are doing. You say:"There would be enough money to pay the mortgage and loan and any arrears but probably nothing left after that."If that is the case, it looks as if you will get nothing if the house is sold, because the debt to you (which I assume is separate from the mortgage & secured loan) will rank behind them unless you also have a charge on the house which was in place before the secured loan.If you are unlikely to get any money from a sale I don''t understand why you are spending money trying to get an order. Fair enough you jointly own the property, but if it is more or less in negative equity there is nothing for him to buy you out from.However, to try & answer your question. If you would gain nothing (or very little) from a sale I find...