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What are the differences between the wyoming constitution and the us constitution? law answers (12680)

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Hello, I live in wyoming and I would like to start a ''private'' militia. By private, I mean not ran by the state. I was just wondering how I would go about this as well as the state and federal laws behind it. I am looking to start a militia because I know it is the only way to technically secure my right to keep an bear arms.

A:  The Supreme Court held earlier this year that individuals have the right to keep and bear arms. It rejected the argument that the Second Amendment only allowed militias to be armed. It is not clear what the scope of the right is, but it is clear that you don''t need to be in a militia to invoke it. Besides, the Second Amendment was referring to militias controlled by the states, not to private organizations which someone wants to call by the same name. You couldn''t form a private organization that would qualify as a militia even if you wanted to. The National Guard is the current incarnation of the militias. If you want to be a member of a militia, joining the Guard is the way to go about it....

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what constitutes harrassment? Washington West Virginia Wisconsin wyoming

A:  i work for a construction company (a very reputable one).my boss yells in our faces and threatens our job weekly. he seems to think he is above the law.he doesn''t allow us breaks that we are legally intitled to.one of his family members works with us and constantly sexualy harresses me and the other girls on the site. my boss is aware of this but does nothing.and this relative brags about how nothing will ever happen to him because he''ll just tell his wife. he has actually proven this to be true.our boss has told us on meeting days we don''t get breaks because that is our break.he always threatens people that if they go to the office they will be fired.certain people in the office are just as corrupt as him and frankly i''m not sure who to go to because so many...

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What Is a constitutional Amendment?

A:  A constitutional amendment is an addition or change to the constitution that administers a government or organization. A constitution is the initial charter adopted when such a body is first formed. This is the primary document group members will reference when considering a questionable law or practice. It is designed to apply as written throughout the organizationís existence. Amending a constitution can be a rigorous process, because such amendments must be judged to uphold the spirit of the original document. The U.S. constitution is probably the most famous example of an amended constitution, but it is not the...

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What are the Primary Theories of constitutional Interpretation?

A:  Theories of constitutional interpretation in the United States are varied and complex, but most fall into one of several major categories. Judges charged with deciding constitutional issues may subscribe to a number of different theories including originalism, textualism, intentionalism, contextualism, constructionism, pragmatism, non-interpretivism and dynamic evolution. Fortunately, many of these theories of constitutional interpretation are somewhat related to each other, making them slightly easier to comprehend and group together. For example, those who take an originalism approach believe that the U.S. constitution should be interpreted as close to its original meaning as possible....

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In constitutional law, What is an Alien?

A:  In constitutional law, or more specifically Immigration law, an alien is anyone who is not a national or citizen of the United States. Any number of individuals living or staying within the borders of the United States can be considered aliens. All aliens are non-citizens, but a national is neither a citizen, nor an alien. The basis for categorizing individuals as aliens is set by the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 (INA). The INA defines the different categories to which an individual alien is assigned as follows; resident and non-resident aliens, immigrant and non-immigrant aliens, and documented or undocumented/illegal aliens. In more general terms, United States federal immigration

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What Are constitutional Rights?

A:  constitutional rights are fairly easily defined though they donít exist for all people and may not be the same in different areas of the world. These rights are those guaranteed to people and explicitly stated in a government''s constitution, which sets forth laws of the region. There are many countries that have implicit constitutional rights instead, but some countries make a statement of rights to which citizens and possibly others in the country are entitled. A familiar example of constitutional rights is the United States of America''s constitution, which devotes its first ten amendments to explicitly defining the rights of its people. ...

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What is constitutional law?

A:  constitutional law relates to the study, practice, interpretation and administration of laws set forth by a countryís constitution. In the US, for example, the US constitution is the basis for all constitutional law. Any legal subjects that deal with constitutional rights or violations are a part of constitutional law. Experts in constitutional law may participate in cases that seem to be in clear violation of the constitution. Additionally,

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constitution

A:  I should add that each article granting one of the mentioned basic rights provides specific conditions under which the respective freedom can be constrained by legislative action. One condition which is applicable for any kind of freedom is that any act of the legislative must acknowledge the principle of proportionality. This means that the encroachment upon the freedom must be necessary in order to pursue a definitive and legitimate aim. Furthermore, the essence of the freedom must not be harmed. Thirdly, the degree the encroachment must stay in due proportion to the aim which is pursued by the act. The due application of the principle of proportionality and of other conditions is in full subject of scrutiny by the Federal constitutional Court to which anyone who...

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constitution

A:  There are many differences because the German Basic law is more than 150 years younger than the American constitution. Moreover, they reflect different historical experiences of both people. Regarding the organization of the state: Both countries are federal states. The German president has only a representative function and no executive powers. The German federal government is much more embedded into the legislative branch. The members of parliament and not the people elect the chancellor (the holder of executive power and head of the federal government). Members of the German upper house (Bundesrat) are not elected senators like in the U.S. but the heads of the states` executives. For this reason, debates in...

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constitution

A:  Germany`s history had been very volatile compaired to the US and the country saw several  collapses of its institutions depleating the wealth of the nation: (catchwords/ overview: - failure to establish a unified democratic civic German state in the course of the German revolution in 1848/ 1849 against the nobility (the first German democratic constitution adopted in Frankfurt in St. Pauls Church was in force only for a short period of time), - the foundation of the German empire in 1871 pushed by the king of Prussia (second constitution providing a powerful chancellor elected by the emperor and a parliament (Reichstag)), - oppression of the opposing social democratic movement and prosperity of the nation until WW I, -...