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What are the consequences if you refuse to serve jury duty? law answers (69644)

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Q: 

Should doctors be penalized for refusing to perform abortions?

A:  No, I''m pro-choice, but its their right not to refuse. They shouldn''t have to do something that is against their own personal beliefs. They didn''t go to medical school to be an abortion doctor.... and there are other doctors that would do the procedure. No doctors are required by government (in the u.s.) to perform abortions or any other procedure. On the other hand, if a doctor accepts a job that involves abortions and then refuses to do the job, he/she should be fired and go find a job with different requirements. According to the Supreme Court, it is legal. I guess they can refuse. If I went to a mechanic for car repairs, I guess they can refuse me service. Punished? No. They...

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I was terminated from a job because I would not violate the law. Is refusing to break the law just cause for termination?

A:  Is refusing to break the law just cause for termination? Emphatically NO! This week we will discuss one of the most important exceptions to employment-at-will, the public policy exception. Although the exception varies from state to state, generally this exception provides that an employer may not terminate an employee for a reason which contravenes a substantial public policy of a state.One of the earliest cases in this area originated in California when an employee was fired from his job because he refused to commit perjury. The courts found that the employer''s retaliation against the employee was against public policy. In Indiana, the courts held that the discharge of an employee in retaliation for filing a...

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How or what are the lawful ways of refusing service to a rude customer?

A:  You have the right to refuse a rude or unruly customer at any time. You also have the right to not have them allowed back into the store. The saying goes, the customer is always right, but not if they are acting in a disorderly fashion. Just ask them to leave in a nice way. Don''t stoop to their level. Besides you said this is on a regular basis. If they don''t leave, call the police and they will remove them for you. They will get the hint. Just tell her that you have the right to refuse service to anyone and that you are invoking that right. Tell her that if she can find someone else that is willing to help her then by all means do so. I was in the service industry for 15+ years and I have refused service to...

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Can I file a lawsuit? My friends were refused the right to buy alcohol? The cashier said she thinks...?

A:  Sorry pal no lawsuit. Anyone who sells alchol can refuse service if they feel that there is a reasonable reason for it. You won''t get any legal help. They were at least a little intoxicated, they must have done something she didn''t feel comfortable with, you would have no case. Stores can refuse service for a LOT of reasons. With the number of lawsuits in the past few years, alcohol providers are liable to err on the side of caution. I doubt anyone would fault the clerk for playing it safe, and unless you all had a blood alcohol test taken at the time, it''s your word against hers. If you look around in the store, you will probably see a sign that says that lady has...

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Can you legally refuse to answer a question during the jury selection process?

A:  Actually, I cannot believe a judge would allow it. FYI - for all you budding lawyers out there - you can only plead the 5th when you are asked about a CRIME! You know, the right to refuse to INCRIMINATE yourself? Masturbation is not a crime, except in a few backwards jurisdictions that haven''t cleaned up their penal code in a few decades. In any event, in jury selection, you are under oath, and you are supposed to answer. I can''t believe that there would be any penalty imposed if you just told the judge you weren''t comfortable with it. Yes. We do have the 5th amendment. http://www.dryflypolitics.com I dont know if a person can legally do it but its surely none of his business and just flat...

Q: 

Job Duties Changed Can I refuse?

A:  Only an attorney who has read your contract can answer your questions. Hey CBG- I hope some of your other 1,186 posts were more informative than that. How about answering "in general". Anyone else who feels like taking a crack at this, despite Mr. CBG, I would welcome any opinions. Thanks Jason, whether you like it or not, the fact remains that your contract is going to rule here. As far as the law is concerned, yes, they can LEGALLY fire you for refusing a change of duties, but if you have a bona fide contract that says otherwise, that makes a difference. So ONLY someone who has read your contract can tell you the answers, because ONLY someone who has read your contract knows what the contract does and does not permit. And you...

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Is the right to refuse service really a law or just an urban legend?

A:  I can answer for the law of the U.S. but not other nations. You can deny service for a good reason, or no reason at all. In most businesses that are open to the public, though, you cannot deny service for a bad reason, like the race, religion, or gender of the customer. Proving that service was denied for a bad reason is difficult but not impossible. It usually requires an expensive and time-consuming lawsuit. That is mostly an urban legend. Statutes in nearly every state prohibit businesses from discriminating (i.e. refusing service) on the basis of a customer''s gender, race, nationality, age, marital status, etc. But there is nothing that prohibits a business from refusing service to a customer based on other characteristics, such as...

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What Are the consequences of Petty Larceny in New York?

A:  In the state of New York, petit larceny is classified as a Class A Misdemeanor, which is subject to up to one year in jail, along with the assessments of fines, restitution and court costs. Please see the information at the following link for further discussion:http://www.thephantomwriters.com/free_content/db/r/petit-larceny.shtmlThe following are NY statutes:§ 155.05 Penal. Larceny; defined.1. A person steals property and commits larceny when, with intent todeprive another of property or to appropriate the same to himself or to athird person, he wrongfully takes, obtains or withholds such property froman owner thereof.2. Larceny includes a wrongful taking, obtaining or withholding ofanother''s property, with the intent prescribed in subdivision one of thissection, committed in any of...

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Worried about being terminated

A:  WAY WAY too much information. The bottom line is you can be fired for any reason that isn't protected by law (gender, age, race, religion etc.), because it's Wednesday, or no reason at all if you don't have a union CBA, or written contract. Even under the last two circumstances they may still terminate you if within the bounds of the CBA or contract. Refusing to sign the write ups was grounds to terminate you alone for insubordination. For future reference signing those notices does not mean you agree with them merely that you are acknowledging receiving them. Make your own rebuttal statement in writing and then sign if you don't agree. Your recourse (and my suggestion) at this point is to keep your head down and try and go un-noticed and hope this...

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Final Decree questions

A:  1. What is obvious to you may not be so obvious to outsiders. I am guessing that shared parenting would involve him having the kids for a greater percentage of the time than is currently ordered. That might lower his overall child support obligation. I am not in your state, but many states factor the amount of time that the child spends with each parent into the overall child support obligation. 2. In an appeal, the aggrieved party asks the next higher court to review the decision of the trial court (or the decision of a lower appeals court, depending upon where the case may be). Usually, the aggrieved party tries to identify errors that it thinks the lower court made and asks the appellate court to set aside, remand or reverse the decision that the trial court made. The appeals court...