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Does power of attorney transfer from one state to another? law answers (111129)

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Q: 

How can I go about as power of attorney transferring guardianship of my mother?

A:  You can end your duties as the agent under your mother’s power of attorney if you’re no longer able and willing to perform them. But the local court—usually the superior court—will need to know that there is someone who is able to attend to her needs if she is unable to do that herself. The best route for you may be to petition for a conservatorship, also called an adult guardianship, which gives another person the legal right to make necessary decisions on your mother’s behalf. It would allow the person appointed to oversee or personally be responsible for her care, custody, and control. If your siblings are not willing to take on the job, and you know of no other relative or friend to do it, then the...

Q: 

What is involved in transferring power of attorney to my daughter?

A:  Typically, a new agent is appointed by already being named as a successor in the power of attorney, or by revoking the old and replacing with a new power of attorney....

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power of attorney

A:  Try legalzoom.com Not only do they have much information, you can get the proper forms and instructions there without the cost of an attorney. Good Luck. First of course your father has to be able to know what is going on, and sign the power of attorney paperwork, ** but it is just as easy to let him sign the deed when you sell the property. But you get paperwork naming you power of attoreny, have him sign it, it will be witnessed and notarised. If you plan on transfering the title to yourself, I would not do it, since you as power of attorney transfering ( selling) the home to you may...

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My daughter has Healthcare power of attorney, can she put my wife in a nursing home against my wish?

A:  I am prohibited from giving a legal opinion. The answer will depend on the wording of the document. I''m assuming the power of attorney was signed in SC. The South Carolina Code has a statute that authorizes a person to create a health care power of attorney. Under such a POA, the agent appointed has the authority to admit the principal to a nursing home if the principal no longer has the ability to make such decisions. In order to be valid, the POA must be notarized. The following is a portion of SC statute: § 62-5-504. Health Care power of attorney; definitions; form(S) (1) Notwithstanding the requirements of subsections (C) and (D) of...

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Can my brother force me into giving power of attorney to him?

A:  A power of attorney is a legal instrument that gives someone else the authority to make certain decisions and act for the signer. The person who has these powers is called an agent or attorney-in-fact. The person designated to be the agent assumes certain responsibilities, including acting in the principal''s best interest and following the principal''s directions. Agents are ''fiduciaries,'' which means that the agent must act with the highest degree of good faith in behalf of their principals. Although an agent is supposed to make decisions in the principal''s best interest and to use the principal''s money and other assets only for the principal''s benefit, the agent nevertheless has...

Q: 

Can a patent agent sign a revocation of power of attorney form?

A:  I just went through this.  You file PTO/SB/81 "power of attorney or Revocation of power of attorney with a New power of attorney and Change of Correspondence Address".  The form was just updated in July, so make sure you download the latest one from the USPTO website.  There are two people who can sign:  (1)Applicant/Inventor OR (2) Assignee of record of the entire interest.  Since you are dealing with an in-house patent agent, I assume that the inventor was or is working for a company.  In which case he most likely assigned his rights to the company.  If so, you need to find out who in the company...

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does a sibling have any say in her mother''s burial planning if she does not have power of attorney?

A:  Any power the sister holds by dint of the power of attorney ends when your friend''s mother dies. So that will not likely be the sticking point in their situation. But to avoid an unpleasant psychological wrestling match when death does occur, you should urge your friend to put a few safety guards in place. While she''s still alive, the mother''s wishes can rule. The strongest protection would be her to put her wishes in writing – and this may already have been accomplished if the mother was a party to the purchase contract with the mortuary. If she was not, urge the mother to write a brief outline of her preferences and sign it, preferably attached to a copy of the mortuary contract....

Q: 

What is power of attorney?

A:  A power of attorney or POA is a legal document which authorizes someone to act on behalf of someone else. The person granting the power of attorney is known as the principal, granter, or donor, while the person authorized to act is called an agent, attorney-in-fact, or attorney, in some regions of the world. There are many different types of power of attorney, and these documents can be immensely useful and flexible. However, they can also be dangerous, especially for people who do not realize that they are agreeing to when they sign a power of

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What can I do if I feel my sister has abused her power of attorney over my mother?

A:  A power of attorney is a legal instrument that individuals create and sign that gives someone else the authority to make certain decisions and act for the signer. The person who has these powers is called an ''agent'' or ''attorney-in-fact.'' The signer is the ''principal.'' The principal must have mental capacity to make the power of attorney at the time of signing. As a principal, if the principal''s decisions conflict with those of the agent, the principal''s decision will govern, assuming that the agent confers with the principal prior to taking an action. If an agent has acted on the principal''s behalf and acted within the scope of...

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What can I do if I believe a relative abused the power of attorney over my aunt for his own gain?

A:  A power of attorney is a legal instrument that individuals create and sign that gives someone else the authority to make certain decisions and act for the signer. The person who has these powers is called an ''agent'' or ''attorney-in-fact.'' The signer is the ''principal.'' The principal must have mental capacity to make the power of attorney at the time of signing. As a principal, if the principal''s decisions conflict with those of the agent, the principal''s decision will govern, assuming that the agent confers with the principal prior to taking an action. If an agent has acted on the principal''s behalf and acted within the scope of...