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Child custody, supervised visitation, termination of parental rights? law answers (425339)

People haved asked the following law querstions similar to "child custody, supervised visitation, termination of parental rights?". If you have other legal doubts, use the box above to get answers.

Q: 

Should first mothers be allowed to parent after relinquishing a child?

A:  If it was an open adoption, then it would depend on the conditions you applied for and were approved for at the time you chose to adopt. If however, the birth mother found the child afterward, then this is obsurd. As a adopted child from age 7 mos. and an individual who may need to adopt in the future, I wouldnt agree to an open adoption. Open adoptions basically allow you to pay for the child, but not accept complete ''parenting'' rights to the child. It is as if you are sharing the child, which makes it very confusing on the child. If however, you agreed to an open adoption, then you can not after the fact of...

Q: 

Pregnant, tired, and confused about getting full rights and custidy

A:  Well as many have said on here you are the greatest factor in who fathers your children you choose to have sex with someone knowing that there is always a possibility of pregnancy no matter how slim that chance no protection is 100%. That being said you will have to fight him in court. You petition the judge for full physical and full legal custody but there is no such thing as him signing over his rights unless you have been married to another man for at least one year that wants to adopt. You will have to prove his alcohol abuse to the judge and have proof of any other claims you have as to why he shouldn''t get visitation. However, he is likely to still get supervised visits. If he is truly AWOL, then report him...

Q: 

Sole Custody with Abandnment in CA

A:  She is Mom and she has a right to her children.  As long as she fights for those rights, it is very unlikely the courts give Dad sole custody and zero visitation so you can adopt them. It is not abandonment when Mom is calling.  If there is no specified child support amount, he can file for that, If there is a set amount and she isn't paying then he files for contempt....but the courts are highly unlikely to erase her from their lives so you can step in. Of course she can be granted a specified visitation plan, she has rights too.  He is going to have a really hard time telling a judge he is going to file for abandonment when she is on the phone fighting to have her kids...

Q: 

Step parent adoption?

A:  Even though one parent has sole custody the other parent is still their parent and still has rights. Your husband will have to petition the court to have her parental rights terminated, if she will not willingly sign them off. Then after that is done you can file to legally adopt her. Go see a lawyer who deals with family law they will be able to file the paper work for you and make sure everything is done legally. You do not have to pay her for this to be done if she ask for money then just have your lawyer petition the court for the termination of parental rights...

Q: 

fathers'' rights relinquished- any grandparents'' rights?

A:  Relinquishing rights often isn't the same as terminating the parent-child relationship. The PCR is sort of like a marriage. It's a LEGAL relationship between persons. Until terminated, it continues, even if the rights aren't being used. Wording aside, it isn't what it appears. A termination of parental rights under the law goes with an adoption. What your ex has done is waive his vistation. As long as he is obligated to provide financial support for the child, he is still dad and he can take it back to court and seek to have his visitation reinstated. No Arkansas attorneys...

Q: 

How do I sign over rights to the father once my baby is born?

A:  You need to file a petition with the appropriate juvenile court seeking to terminate your parental rights....

Q: 

child abandonement

A:  Contact an attorney and file for sole custody. If he does want to see the children that would be his choice, as for abandonement he did, and that will be your case for sole custody, also have child support enforced. Strictly speaking, the only way his paternal rights would be abandoned would be if someone else wanted to adopt your daughter. Normally, the father would have to give consent so you''d have to demonstrate that you''ve made every reasonable good faith attempt to contact him. If he''s then nowhere to be found, the adoption could proceed without him and his rights would be terminated. ?...Defined A termination of

Q: 

If a father gives up custody... does he still have to pay?

A:  Your post was answered on another thread. custody, and giving up parental rights are 2 seperate things. He just cannot give up his rights on the child. Giving mom custody means just that, it has nothing to do with parental rights. He created the child, he must still help support it. Unless she is remarried and her husband is willing to adopt, he cannot terminate his rights. If mom gets custody he will have to pay child support regardless. Custody and termination of parental

Q: 

Can we take care of all the paperwork at once?

A:  For starters, you need to find out if WA will permit voluntary termination of parental rights w/o a stepparent willing to adopt. Generally, courts do not like to leave a child w/o two parents liable for support, for a variety of reasons. This may well be something that you CANNOT do. A possible option wrt support is to come to a written agreement to refund the CS. Of course, unless it''s ordered by a court, it''s not binding on you. Is there someplace on the web that I can find out about the WA state law on the matter of revoking his rights?...

Q: 

Poss. Step Parent Adoption....long story sorry

A:  Laymans take: The steps for termination of parental rights are generally strictly construed--so if Dad complete the necessary  MO TPR  petition but same was never presented to court and entered as an order then Dads being dad was never treminated!   So if Mom dropped the ball or  deliberately wrecked the ball--and it did not get done--then it did not get done. In hindsight it was a judgement error to assume Mom would get it done having asked Dad to do his part. Whether husband picked up the ball is not relevant--if there was no valid ball to pick up..... Between the social networking sites mentioned, friend could probably figure out what county the child lives in...